Constance Fenimore Woolson"s nineteenth century essays

Cover of: Constance Fenimore Woolson

Published by Wayne State University Press in Detroit, Mich .

Written in English

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Places:

  • United States

Subjects:

  • Woolson, Constance Fenimore, 1840-1894 -- Criticism and interpretation.,
  • Woolson, Constance Fenimore, 1840-1894 -- Friends and associates.,
  • Woolson, Constance Fenimore, 1840-1894 -- Contemporaries.,
  • Women and literature -- United States -- History -- 19th century.,
  • Travelers" writings, American -- History and criticism.,
  • Travel writing -- History -- 19th century.,
  • Regionalism in literature.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Book details

Statementedited by Victoria Brehm.
ContributionsBrehm, Victoria, 1947-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPS3363 .C66 2001
The Physical Object
Pagination255 p. :
Number of Pages255
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3937598M
ISBN 100814329330
LC Control Number2001001362

Download Constance Fenimore Woolson"s nineteenth century

"Constance Fenimore Woolson" by Anne Boyd Rioux, a biography of Woolson, gives the 19th century novelist some of the due she's been lacking thus far. Constance Fenimore Woolson's Nineteenth Century: Essays offers a collection of critical essays from different theoretical perspectives that offer new insights into Woolson and reintegrate her into nineteenth-century : Hardcover.

"These essays explore topics crucial to understanding the period's literature and suggest new directions for scholarship. Together they constitute a collection that expands the available body of criticism about Woolson and her contemporaries. This book is indispensable reading for anyone interested in nineteenth-century women's fiction and travel writing."--Jacket.

Get this from a library. Constance Fenimore Woolson's nineteenth century: essays. [Victoria Brehm;] -- "Although she is one of the lesser-known figures in American literature, Constance Fenimore Woolson () authored some of the most carefully crafted and realistic short stories of the post.

Edited by Victoria Brehm. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, pp. $ This excellent collection of fourteen essays justifies the editor's claim that the work of Constance Fenimore Woolson is a "rich source for understanding nineteenth-century history and culture" ().

Constance Fenimore Woolson, “Miss Grief” When Constance Fenimore Woolson died in Venice in at the age of fifty-three, having jumped or fallen out of a third-story window, she was memorialized in all the major American papers, compared with George Eliot, Jane Austen, and the Brontës as one of the greatest women writers in English.

Constance Fenimore Woolson (), who contributed to Henry James's conception of his heroine Isabelle Archer in The Portrait of a Lady, was one of the most accomplished American writers of the nineteenth century. Yet today the best-known (and most-misunderstood) facts of her life are her relationship with James and her probable suicide in Reviews: 6.

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Collected Stories (LOA #) the first major edition of 19th-century America's greatest woman. Story of the Week Febru Constance Fenimore Woolson, “Solomon” Constance Fenimore Woolson (–) From Constance Fenimore Woolson: Collected Stories.

Hermitage, c.by an unknown Hermitage, a log cabin, was one of the six original structures built in Zoar by German settlers in –   Constance Fenimore Woolson was considered one of the most important writers of the 19th century.

Click To Tweet. In fact, when the two writers first met inJames took time out from working on his masterpiece to show Woolson around Florence for four weeks because she reminded him of the heroine he was trying to capture on the page.

Constance Fenimore Woolson (–), who contributed to Henry James’s conception of his heroine Isabelle Archer in The Portrait of a Lady, was one of the most accomplished American writers of the nineteenth today the best-known (and most-misunderstood) facts of her life are her relationship with James and her probable suicide in Venice/5.

As Rioux points out in Constance Fenimore Woolson: Portrait of a Lady Novelist, her new biography of Woolson, Woolson was herself widely studied and critically celebrated in nineteenth century.

Author/Artist etc.: woolson constance fenimore Edit Your Search. Results (1 - 30) of 1, A landmark of literary recovery: the first major edition of an overlooked genius who in her lifetime was considered 19th-century America’s greatest woman writer In the eyes of her contemporaries, Constance Fenimore Woolson () ranked with George Eliot as one of the two greatest women writers of the English language.

Constance Fenimore Woolson (–), who contributed to Henry James’s conception of his heroine Isabelle Archer in The Portrait of a Lady, was one of the most accomplished American writers of the nineteenth today the best-known (and most-misunderstood) facts of her life are her relationship with James and her probable suicide in Venice.

Constance Fenimore Woolson: Collected Stories (LOA #) (Library of America) I've normally shied away from books written in the 19th century, but after reading Anne I'll have to revise that and say that the story and the characters, though certainly exhibiting the morality and mindset of that era, tell a most engrossing story, a true page Reviews: Constance Fenimore Woolson, a grand-niece of James Fenimore Cooper, was a prolific and acclaimed 19th-century writer in her own right, penning novels and short stories set in such places as Michigan's Mackinac Island and the postbellum South.

Woolson also had a. Constance Fenimore Woolson was a popular American writer of the late 19th century whose friendship with Henry James has, among James scholars, long qualified hers as a distinctly lesser life. NONFICTION: A fascinating biography of 19th-century writer Constance Fenimore Woolson, friend to Henry James and precursor to strong women writers such as Sylvia Plath.

A critically esteemed and best-selling author during her lifetime in the second half of the 19th century, Constance Fenimore Woolson faded from view in the 20th century.

Constance Fenimore Woolson's nineteenth century: essays southern sketches by Constance Fenimore Woolson (Book) 47 The majority of selections come from 19th-century literary periodicals published in the North, South, and West. They are uniformly strong and demonstrate how intertwined the home and war fronts were.

A landmark of literary recovery: the first major edition of an overlooked genius who in her lifetime was considered 19th-century America's greatest woman writer In the eyes of her contemporaries, Constance Fenimore Woolson () ranked with George Eliot as one of the two greatest women writers of the English language.

She wrote fiction of remarkable intellectual power that outsold those. Constance Fenimore Woolson's Nineteenth Century: Essays. Detroit, Mich.: Wayne State University Press, Detroit, Mich.: Wayne State University Press, "Island Fortresses: The Landscape of the Imagination in the Great Lakes Fiction of Constance Fenimore Woolson.".

Constance Fenimore Woolson, Constance Fenimore Woolson, arr. and ed. Benedict, Clare (London: Ellis, ) to John Hay and Clara Hay: Alice Hall Petry, ‘ “Always, Your Attached Friend”: The Unpublished Letters of Constance Fenimore Woolson to John and Clara Hay’, Books at Brown 29–30 (–3), pp.

11– Constance Fenimore Woolson () is the author of six novels: The Old Stone House (), Anne (), For the Major (), East Angels (), Jupiter Lights (), and Horace Chase (). In her lifetime, two collections of her stories appeared: Castle Nowhere: Lake-Country Sketches () and Rodman the Keeper: Southern Sketches ().

Two more collections were published after her. Constance Fenimore Woolson (March 5, – Janu ) was an American novelist, poet, and short story writer. She was a grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper, and is best known for fictions about the Great Lakes region, the American South, and American expatriates in Europe.

Find a Grave, database and images (: accessed), memorial page for Constance Fenimore Woolson (5 Mar –24 Jan ), Find a Grave Memorial no. citing Campo Cestio, Rome, Città Metropolitana di Roma Capitale, Lazio, Italy ; Maintained by NWO (contributor ).

Constance Fenimore Woolson (–) was one of the few nineteenth-century women writers considered the equal of her male peers. Harper Brothers was so enamored of her work that the firm agreed to publish whatever she could write/5(22). the early part of the twentieth century.

Bibliography Comment, Kristin M. "Lesbian 'Impossibilities' of 'Miss Grief's' 'Armor.'" Constance Fenimore Woolson's Nineteenth Century: Essays. Victoria Brehm, ed. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, Dean, Sharon L.

Constance Fenimore Woolson: Homeward Bound. Knoxville: University of. Constance Fenimore Woolson (–), who contributed to Henry James’s conception of his heroine Isabelle Archer in The Portrait of a Lady, was one of the most accomplished American writers of the nineteenth century.

Yet today the best-known (and most-misunderstood) facts of her life are her relationship with James and her probable. Constance Fenimore Woolson Portrait of A Lady Novelist (Book): Rioux, Anne Boyd: Constance Fenimore Woolson (–), who contributed to Henry James’s conception of his heroine Isabelle Archer of The Portrait of a Lady, was one of the most accomplished American writers of the nineteenth century.

The best known (and most misunderstood) facts of her life are her relationship with James. She wrote travel sketches, poems and a children’s novel under the pseudonym Anne March, as well as a novella, four novels and more than fifty short stories for the major literary magazines of the nineteenth century.

Early Years Constance Fenimore Woolson was. "Biography at its best aims at resurrection. Anne Boyd Rioux has brought the novelist Constance Fenimore Woolson back to life for us.

Hurrah!" —Robert D. Richardson, author of the Bancroft Prize–. Constance Fenimore Woolson (–), who contributed to Henry James’s conception of his heroine Isabelle Archer in The Portrait of a Lady, was one of the most accomplished American writers of the nineteenth century.

Anne, first published in by author Constance Fenimore Woolson, is a work of American literary depicts the emotional and spiritual conflicts faced by its eponymous heroine as she leaves her home village, Mackinac Island, to seek a future as a young woman in the Northeastern United good qualities win her many suitors, but she finds hypocrisy and dysfunctional.

I wrote a dissertation about them and a scholarly book called Writing for Immortality, published in But I couldn’t stop there. One of those writers stayed with me. Her name was Constance Fenimore Woolson ().

Constance Fenimore Woolson: Literary Pioneer. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, DOI: / E-mail Citation» Kern’s book was the first modern assessment of Woolson’s writings, positioning her as a pioneer in local color writing and judging her works to possess an “authentic individuality” (p.

As a `local colorist' of the latter half of the nineteenth century, Constance Fenimore Woolson did participate in a genre going out of fashion at the time of her death, yet as a watcher of women's lives — the single woman, the exile, the artist — she now invites renewed attention.

Constance Fenimore Woolson () was a prominent late-nineteenth-century American writer. Anne Boyd Rioux's biography, Constance Fenimore Woolson: Portrait of a Lady Novelist, provides a rich and detailed, well, portrait, of Woolson, placing her life and work in historical and literary context. It serves not only as an excellent biography.

In recent years Constance Fenimore Woolson () has been fictionalized at least three times, perhaps most notably in Colm Tóibín's award-winning work The Master, a novelization of the life of Woolson's close friend Henry Woolson was a literary star in her own right, publishing in the premier magazines of her day.

Constance Fenimore Woolson's Nineteenth Century: Essays. Ed. Victoria Brehm. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, "'What! Has she got into the "Atlantic"?': Women Writers, the Atlantic Monthly, and the Formation of the American Canon." American Studies 3 (Fall ): Book Suggestions Great Reads from and about the.

Constance Fenimore Woolson was an American Realist writer of renown in the ss, when she was one of the few women considered to be peers with their male counterparts. Woolson published five novels and dozens of short stories before her death in at age For the Major. A Novelette. Constance Fenimore Woolson.

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